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African Wildlife

Stock Photography By Clive Smith

A collection of stock photography, mostly captured in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kms in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kms from north to south and 65 kms from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

African Sunrise
#691208
© Clive Smith
African Sunset
#691214
© Clive Smith
African Sunset
#691083
© Clive Smith
Vultures In A Tree
#691222
© Clive Smith
Vulture In Flight
#691221
© Clive Smith
African Fish Eagle In A Tree
#691220
© Clive Smith
African Fish Eagle
#691219
© Clive Smith
African Fish Eagle In A Tree
#691218
© Clive Smith
African Jacana Lilly Hopping In
#691217
© Clive Smith
Hamerkop Patiently Awaiting His
#691216
© Clive Smith
Swainson's Francolin Takes
#691215
© Clive Smith
Banded-Legged Golden Orb-Web
#691213
© Clive Smith
Banded-Legged Golden Orb-Web
#691212
© Clive Smith
Chameleon Walking Across The
#691211
© Clive Smith
Lapwing At The Edge Of The
#691210
© Clive Smith
Lapwing At The Edge Of The
#691209
© Clive Smith
Turtle Coming Up For Air
#691207
© Clive Smith
African Spurred Tortoise
#691206
© Clive Smith
Chameleon Crosses The Road
#691205
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron Fishing
#691204
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron On Tree Stump
#691203
© Clive Smith
Scops Owl
#691202
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron Fishing
#691201
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron And Crocodile
#691200
© Clive Smith
Giant Kingfisher
#691199
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller In A Bush
#691198
© Clive Smith
Saddle-Billed Stork Fishing
#691197
© Clive Smith
Giraffe Drinking
#691196
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller On
#691195
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller On Road
#691194
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller Taking
#691193
© Clive Smith
Male Nyala
#691192
© Clive Smith
Greater Kudu Female
#691191
© Clive Smith
Greater Kudu At Waterhole
#691190
© Clive Smith
Greater Kudu Female
#691189
© Clive Smith
Greater Kudu Male
#691188
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Female
#691187
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Grazing
#691186
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Grazing
#691185
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Male
#691184
© Clive Smith
Cape Hunting Dog
#691183
© Clive Smith
Puff Adder Crosses The Road
#691182
© Clive Smith
Typical South African Bush
#691181
© Clive Smith
Monitor Lizard Basks On A Rock
#691180
© Clive Smith
Monitor Lizard On Rock
#691179
© Clive Smith
Crocodile In Water
#691178
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey In Tree
#691177
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691176
© Clive Smith
Young Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691175
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena Walking
#691174
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691173
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691172
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena Under Bush
#691171
© Clive Smith
Crocodile On Embankment
#691170
© Clive Smith
Crocodile In Water
#691169
© Clive Smith
Lion Roar
#691168
© Clive Smith
Lion
#691167
© Clive Smith
Lion Roar
#691166
© Clive Smith
Lion With Kill
#691165
© Clive Smith
Baboon Family
#691164
© Clive Smith
Baboon Family
#691163
© Clive Smith
Baboon Family
#691162
© Clive Smith
Baboon In Tree
#691161
© Clive Smith
Baboon Family
#691160
© Clive Smith
Baboon Family
#691159
© Clive Smith
Baboon Family
#691158
© Clive Smith
Baboon in Grass
#691157
© Clive Smith
Impala Male
#691156
© Clive Smith
Impala Female
#691155
© Clive Smith
Impala Male
#691154
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest
#691153
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest Grazing
#691152
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest Vertical
#691151
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest Staring
#691150
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo At The River
#691149
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo At The River
#691148
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691147
© Clive Smith
Zebra Baby
#691146
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691145
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691144
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691143
© Clive Smith
Zebra Grazing
#691142
© Clive Smith
Zebra Alert
#691141
© Clive Smith
Rhino Resting
#691139
© Clive Smith
Rhino Head-On
#691138
© Clive Smith
Rhino Muddy
#691137
© Clive Smith
Rhino Mother And Calf
#691136
© Clive Smith
Southern Ground Hornbill
#691135
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo
#691134
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo Grazing
#691133
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo
#691132
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo
#691131
© Clive Smith
Elephant Grazing
#691130
© Clive Smith
Elephant Flaps Ears To Cool Off
#691129
© Clive Smith
Elephant Baby At Waters Edge
#691128
© Clive Smith
Elephant Tuskers Rutting
#691127
© Clive Smith
Baby Elephant Walking On Dirt
#691126
© Clive Smith
Elephant
#691125
© Clive Smith
Elephant
#691124
© Clive Smith
Elephant Mother And Baby
#691123
© Clive Smith
Elephant Eye Closeup
#691122
© Clive Smith
Elephant Eye Closeup
#691121
© Clive Smith
Elephant Closeup
#691120
© Clive Smith
Elephant Baby
#691119
© Clive Smith
Elephant Closeup
#691118
© Clive Smith
Elephant Eye Closeup
#691117
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey In Tree
#691116
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey Eating
#691115
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey Eating
#691114
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey Keeping a Lookout
#691113
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey Eating
#691112
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey Sitting
#691111
© Clive Smith
Vervet Monkey Eating
#691110
© Clive Smith
Young Cheetah
#691085
© Clive Smith
Baby Elephant Walking On Dirt
#691084
© Clive Smith
Two Zebras Stationary
#691082
© Clive Smith
Angry Male Elephant
#691081
© Clive Smith
Cheetah Mom & Three Cubs
#691078
© Clive Smith

 

Photo Captions for African Wildlife

Image #1. African Sunrise A typical African sunrise in the bush, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kilometres (7,580 sq mi) in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kilometres (220 mi) from north to south and 65 kilometres (40 mi) from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Image #2. African Sunset A typical African sunset in the bush, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kilometres (7,580 sq mi) in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kilometres (220 mi) from north to south and 65 kilometres (40 mi) from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Image #3. African Sunset A typical African sunset in the bush, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kilometres (7,580 sq mi) in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kilometres (220 mi) from north to south and 65 kilometres (40 mi) from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Image #4. Vultures In A Tree A group of vultures hang around for their next meal. Vultures seldom attack healthy animals, but may kill the wounded or sick. When a carcass has too thick a hide for its beak to open, it waits for a larger scavenger to eat first. Vast numbers have been seen upon battlefields. They gorge themselves when prey is abundant, until their crop bulges, and sit, sleepy or half torpid, to digest their food. These birds do not carry food to their young in their claws, but disgorge it from the crop.

Image #5. Vulture In Flight A vulture takes off in search of his prey. Vultures seldom attack healthy animals, but may kill the wounded or sick. When a carcass has too thick a hide for its beak to open, it waits for a larger scavenger to eat first. Vast numbers have been seen upon battlefields. They gorge themselves when prey is abundant, until their crop bulges, and sit, sleepy or half torpid, to digest their food. These birds do not carry food to their young in their claws, but disgorge it from the crop.

Image #6. African Fish Eagle In A Tree An African Fish Eagle, Haliaeetus Vocifer, watches for food from a tall tree. The African fish eagle is a large bird, and the female, at 3.2-3.6 kg is larger than the male, at 2-2.5 kg. Males usually have a wingspan of about 2 m, while females have wingspans of 2.4 m. While this species mainly subsists on fish, it is opportunistic and may take a wider variety of prey such as waterbirds. Its distinctive cry is, for many, evocative of the spirit or essence of Africa.

Image #7. African Fish Eagle An African Fish Eagle, Haliaeetus Vocifer, takes off with some twigs for a nest. The African fish eagle is a large bird, and the female, at 3.2-3.6 kg is larger than the male, at 2-2.5 kg. Males usually have a wingspan of about 2 m, while females have wingspans of 2.4 m. While this species mainly subsists on fish, it is opportunistic and may take a wider variety of prey such as waterbirds. Its distinctive cry is, for many, evocative of the spirit or essence of Africa.

Image #8. African Fish Eagle In A Tree An African Fish Eagle, Haliaeetus Vocifer, watches for food from a tall tree. The African fish eagle is a large bird, and the female, at 3.2-3.6 kg is larger than the male, at 2-2.5 kg. Males usually have a wingspan of about 2 m, while females have wingspans of 2.4 m. While this species mainly subsists on fish, it is opportunistic and may take a wider variety of prey such as waterbirds. Its distinctive cry is, for many, evocative of the spirit or essence of Africa.

Image #9. African Jacana Lilly Hopping In Search Of Food An African Jacana, Actophilornis Africanus, hopes from pad to pad. African Jacanas are conspicuous and unmistakable birds. They are about 30cm long, but females are larger than males. African Jacanas feed on insects and other invertebrates picked from the floating vegetation or the surface of the water.

Image #10. Hamerkop Patiently Awaiting His Next Meal The Hamerkop, Scopus Umbretta, is a medium-sized wading bird 56 cms in length with a weight of 470 grams. The shape of its head with a long bill and crest at the back is reminiscent of a hammer, hence its name. Hamerkops feed during the day, often taking a break at noon to roost. They normally feed alone or in pairs. The food is typical of long-legged wading birds, and the most important is amphibians. They also eat fish, shrimp, insects and rodents.

Image #11. Swainson's Francolin Takes A Bath A mother Swainson's Francolin, Francolinus Swainsonii, takes a dust bath, whilst her baby walks away. Francolins are terrestrial (though not flightless) birds that feed on insects, vegetable matter and seeds. Most of the members have a hooked upper beak, well-suited for digging at the bases of grass tussocks and rootballs. They have wide tails with fourteen retrice feathers.

Image #12. Banded-Legged Golden Orb-Web Spider A Banded-Legged Golden Orb-Web Spider, Nephila Senegalensis, in his web. The name comes from the fact that the joints of the spider are typically coloured a golden yellow. It is common in the savannas of South Africa. Males are much smaller than females. These spiders are diurnal and weave impressive webs.

Image #13. Banded-Legged Golden Orb-Web Spider A Banded-Legged Golden Orb-Web Spider, Nephila Senegalensis, in his web. The name comes from the fact that the joints of the spider are typically coloured a golden yellow. It is common in the savannas of South Africa. Males are much smaller than females. These spiders are diurnal and weave impressive webs.

Image #14. Chameleon Walking Across The Road Chameleons are a distinctive and highly specialized clade of lizards. The approximately 160 species of chameleon come in a range of colors, and many species have the ability to change colors. Chameleons are distinguished by their zygodactylous feet; their separately mobile, stereoscopic eyes; their very long, highly modified, rapidly extrudable tongues; their swaying gait; and crests or horns on their distinctively shaped heads.

Image #15. Lapwing At The Edge Of The Water Vanellinae are any of various crested plovers, family Charadriidae, noted for its slow, irregular wingbeat in flight and a shrill, wailing cry. Its length is 10–16 inches. They are a subfamily of medium-sized wading birds which also includes the plovers and dotterels. The Vanellinae are collectively called lapwings but also contain the ancient red-kneed dotterel. A lapwing can be thought of as a larger plover.

Image #16. Lapwing At The Edge Of The Water Vanellinae are any of various crested plovers, family Charadriidae, noted for its slow, irregular wingbeat in flight and a shrill, wailing cry. Its length is 10–16 inches. They are a subfamily of medium-sized wading birds which also includes the plovers and dotterels. The Vanellinae are collectively called lapwings but also contain the ancient red-kneed dotterel. A lapwing can be thought of as a larger plover.

Image #17. Turtle Coming Up For Air Turtles are reptiles of the order Chelonii or Testudines, characterised by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs and acting as a shield. Turtle may refer to the chelonian order as a whole (American English) or to fresh-water and sea-dwelling chelonians (British English. Turtles are classified as amniotes, along with other reptiles. Like other amniotes, turtles breathe air and do not lay eggs underwater, although many species live in or around water.

Image #18. African Spurred Tortoise Crosses The Road Centrochelys Sulcata is the third-largest species of tortoise in the world and the largest of the mainland tortoises. Adults are usually 60–90 cm in length and can weigh 45 – 91 kg. They grow from hatchling size 5-7 cm very quickly, reaching 15–25 cm within the first few years of their lives. The lifespan of an African spurred tortoise is about 50–150 years.

Image #19. Chameleon Crosses The Road Chameleons are a distinctive and highly specialized clade of lizards. The approximately 160 species of chameleon come in a range of colors, and many species have the ability to change colors. Chameleons are distinguished by their zygodactylous feet; their separately mobile, stereoscopic eyes; their very long, highly modified, rapidly extrudable tongues; their swaying gait; and crests or horns on their distinctively shaped heads.

Image #20. Grey Heron Fishing The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #21. Grey Heron On Tree Stump The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #22. Scops Owl Scops Owl, Otus Scops, hunt from perches in semi-open landscapes. They prefer areas which contain old trees with hollows; these are home to their prey which includes insects, reptiles, small mammals such as bats and mice and other small birds. Scops will also eat earthworms, amphibians and aquatic invertebrates. Scops have a good sense of hearing which helps them locate their prey in any habitat. They also possess well-developed raptorial claws and a curved bill.

Image #23. Grey Heron Fishing The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #24. Grey Heron And Crocodile The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #25. Giant Kingfisher Giant Kingfisher, Megaceryle Maxima, is the largest kingfisher in Africa. The Giant Kingfisher is 42–48 cm long, with a large crest and finely spotted white on black upperparts. The male has a chestnut breast band and otherwise white underparts with dark flank barring, and the female has a white-spotted black breast band and chestnut belly. This large species feeds mainly on crabs, fish, and frogs, caught in the typical kingfisher way, by a dive from a perch.

Image #26. Lilac-Breasted Roller In A Bush Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

Image #27. Saddle-Billed Stork Fishing Saddle-Billed Stork, Ephippiorhynchus Senegalensis, is a large wading bird in the stork family, Ciconiidae. It is a huge bird that regularly attains a height of 150 cm, a length of 142 cm and a 2.4–2.7 m wingspan. The male is larger and heavier than the female, with a range of 5.1–7.5 kg. The female is usually between 5 and 7 kg. The saddle-billed stork feeds mainly on fish, frogs and crabs, but also on small birds and reptiles. They move in a deliberate and stately manner.

Image #28. Giraffe Drinking The Giraffe, Giraffa Camelopardalis, is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest living terrestrial animal and the largest ruminant. Giraffes usually inhabit savannas, grasslands, and open woodlands. Their primary food source is acacia leaves, which they browse at heights most other herbivores cannot reach. Giraffes are preyed on by lions; their calves are also targeted by leopards, spotted hyenas, and wild dogs. They are at their most vulnerable when bending down.

Image #29. Lilac-Breasted Roller On Signpost Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

Image #30. Lilac-Breasted Roller On Road Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

Image #31. Lilac-Breasted Roller Taking Off From Road Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

Image #32. Male Nyala Male Nyala, Nyala Angasii or Tragelaphus Angasii, also called Inyala, is a spiral-horned antelope native to southern Africa. The body length is 135–195 cm, and it weighs 55–140 kg. As a herbivore, the nyala feeds upon foliage, fruits and grasses, with sufficient fresh water. A shy animal, it prefers water holes rather than open spaces.

Image #33. Greater Kudu Female A Female Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #34. Greater Kudu At Waterhole A Male Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros, stands alert at a watering hole. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #35. Greater Kudu Female A Female Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros, in the bush. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #36. Greater Kudu Male A Male Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros, crosses the road. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #37. Waterbuck Female A Female Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #38. Waterbuck Grazing Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus, graze in the river. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #39. Waterbuck Grazing Three Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus, graze in the river. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #40. Waterbuck Male A Male Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus, looks at the camera. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #41. Cape Hunting Dog A Cape Hunting Dog, Lycaon Pictus, looking for food. It is found only in Africa, especially in savannas and lightly wooded areas. They live and hunt in large packs. Like most members of the dog family, it pursues its prey in a long, open chase. These chases may occur at great speeds of up to 66 km/hr for 10 to 60 minutes. Nearly 80% of all wild dog hunts end in a kill; for comparison, the success rate of lions, often viewed as ultimate predators, is only 30%

Image #42. Puff Adder Crosses The Road A Puff Adder, Bitis Arietans, crosses a road. This venomous viper species is found in savannah and grasslands throughout Africa except for the Sahara and rain forest regions. It is responsible for causing the most snakebite fatalities in Africa. If disturbed, they will hiss loudly and continuously, adopting a tightly coiled defensive posture with the fore part of their body held in a taut "S" shape. At the same time, they may attempt to back away from the threat towards cover.

Image #43. Typical South African Bush A Typical scene in the Kruger National Park. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kilometres (7,580 sq mi) in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kilometres (220 mi) from north to south and 65 kilometres (40 mi) from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Image #44. Monitor Lizard Basks On A Rock A Monitor Lizard, Varanus Albigularis, sitting on a rock, basking in the sun. They have long necks, powerful tails and claws, and well-developed limbs. Most species are terrestrial, but arboreal and semiaquatic monitors are also known. Most species of monitor lizard have a predominantly carnivorous diet, eating eggs, smaller reptiles, fish, birds and small mammals. Some species of monitor lizard also eat fruit and vegetation depending on where they live.

Image #45. Monitor Lizard On Rock A Monitor Lizard, Varanus Albigularis, sitting on a rock, basking in the sun. They have long necks, powerful tails and claws, and well-developed limbs. Most species are terrestrial, but arboreal and semiaquatic monitors are also known. Most species of monitor lizard have a predominantly carnivorous diet, eating eggs, smaller reptiles, fish, birds and small mammals. Some species of monitor lizard also eat fruit and vegetation depending on where they live.

Image #46. Crocodile In Water A Crocodile, Crocodylus Niloticus, lurking in the water. On average this crocodile is between 4.1 metres to 5 metres, weighing around 410 kg. However, specimens measuring 6.1 metres in length and weighing 907 kg have been recorded. It is an opportunistic predator and a very aggressive species of crocodile that is capable of taking almost any animal within its range. Their diet consists mostly of different species of fish, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Image #47. Vervet Monkey In Tree A Vervet Monkey, sitting in a tree. These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50 cm for males to about 40 cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social and dependent alcohol use

Image #48. Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking out from his lair, waiting for his parents, looking at a potential meal. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance.

Image #49. Young Spotted Hyena At Roadside A young Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking out from his lair, waiting for his parents. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km

Image #50. Baby Spotted Hyena Walking A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, walking towards camera. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #51. Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, lies on the sand. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #52. Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking out from his lair, waiting for his parents. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #53. Baby Spotted Hyena Under Bush A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking our from under a bush. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #54. Crocodile On Embankment A Crocodile, Crocodylus Niloticus, sunning himself on the embankment. On average this crocodile is between 4.1 metres to 5 metres, weighing around 410 kg. However, specimens measuring 6.1 metres in length and weighing 907 kg have been recorded. It is an opportunistic predator and a very aggressive species of crocodile that is capable of taking almost any animal within its range. Their diet consists mostly of different species of fish, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Image #55. Crocodile In Water A Crocodile, Crocodylus Niloticus, lurking in the water. On average this crocodile is between 4.1 metres to 5 metres, weighing around 410 kg. However, specimens measuring 6.1 metres in length and weighing 907 kg have been recorded. It is an opportunistic predator and a very aggressive species of crocodile that is capable of taking almost any animal within its range. Their diet consists mostly of different species of fish, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Image #56. Lion Roar A Lion, Panthera Leo, roars for his mate. Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #57. Lion Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #58. Lion Roar A Lion, Panthera Leo, roars for his mate. Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #59. Lion With Kill A male Lion, Panthera Leo, walks away with kill in his mouth. Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #60. Baboon Family Baboon family, Cercopithecinae, including mother, father and baby. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #61. Baboon Family Baboon family, Cercopithecinae, including mother, father and baby. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #62. Baboon Family Baboon family, Cercopithecinae, including mother, father and baby. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #63. Baboon In Tree Baboon, Cercopithecinae, sitting in a tree. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #64. Baboon Family Baboon family, Cercopithecinae, including mother, father and baby. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #65. Baboon Family Baboon family, Cercopithecinae, including mother, father and baby. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #66. Baboon Family Baboon family, Cercopithecinae, including mother, father and baby. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #67. Baboon in Grass Baboon, Cercopithecinae, walking in the grass. Located primarily in southern Africa, the chacma baboon has a wide variety of social behaviors, including a dominance hierarchy, collective foraging, adoption of young by females, and friendship pairings. These behaviors form parts of a complex evolutionary ecology. The chacma baboon is omnivorous with a preference for fruits, while also eating insects, seeds, grass, smaller vertebrate animals, and fungi.

Image #68. Impala Male Impala male, Aepyceros Melampus, closeup. Impalas are typically between 120–160 cm long. Males stand up to approximately 75–92 cm at the shoulder and weigh 53–76 kg, while females are 70–85 cm and 40–53 kg. Both are characterised by a glossy, reddish brown coat. Only the males have the characteristic slender, lyre-shaped horns, which can grow to be 45–92 cm long. Impala are fast runners and are known for their leaping ability, reaching heights up to 3m.

Image #69. Impala Female Impala female, Aepyceros Melampus, looking towards the camera. Impalas are typically between 120–160 cm long. Males stand up to approximately 75–92 cm at the shoulder and weigh 53–76 kg, while females are 70–85 cm and 40–53 kg. Both are characterised by a glossy, reddish brown coat. Only the males have the characteristic slender, lyre-shaped horns, which can grow to be 45–92 cm long. Impala are fast runners and are known for their leaping ability, reaching heights up to 3m.

Image #70. Impala Male Impala male, Aepyceros Melampus, looking towards the camera. Impalas are typically between 120–160 cm long. Males stand up to approximately 75–92 cm at the shoulder and weigh 53–76 kg, while females are 70–85 cm and 40–53 kg. Both are characterised by a glossy, reddish brown coat. Only the males have the characteristic slender, lyre-shaped horns, which can grow to be 45–92 cm long. Impala are fast runners and are known for their leaping ability, reaching heights up to 3m.

Image #71. Blue Wildebeest Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, under a tree. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #72. Blue Wildebeest Grazing Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, grazing. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #73. Blue Wildebeest Vertical Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, looking at the camera. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #74. Blue Wildebeest Staring Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, staring at the camera. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #75. African Buffalo At The River An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, lying in a river to cool off. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #76. African Buffalo At The River An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, lying in a river to cool off. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #77. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #78. Zebra Baby Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #79. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #80. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #81. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #82. Zebra Grazing Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #83. Zebra Alert Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #84. Rhino Resting A Rhino, Rhinocerotidae, resting and recovering, having had his horn hacked off by poachers. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #85. Rhino Head-On A Rhino, Rhinocerotidae, in the tall grass, looking at us head-on. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #86. Rhino Muddy A Rhino, Rhinocerotidae, returns from the river after a mud bath. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #87. Rhino Mother And Calf A Rhino mother and calf, Rhinocerotidae, crossing a road. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #88. Southern Ground Hornbill A Southern Ground Hornbill, Bucorvus Leadbeateri, feeding on dung. This is a large bird, at 90 to 129 cms long. Females weigh 2.2 to 4.6 kg, while the larger males weigh 3.5 to 6.2 kg. It is a vulnerable species, mainly confined to national reserves and parks. They live in groups of 5 to 10 individuals including adults and juveniles. They forage on the ground, where they feed on reptiles, frogs, snails, insects and mammals up to the size of hares.

Image #89. African Buffalo An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, sniffing the air for danger, showing his teeth. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #90. African Buffalo Grazing An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, grazing. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #91. African Buffalo An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, sniffing the air for danger. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #92. African Buffalo An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, grazing. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #93. Elephant Grazing The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #94. Elephant Flaps Ears To Cool Off The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #95. Elephant Baby At Waters Edge The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #96. Elephant Tuskers Rutting The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #97. Baby Elephant Walking On Dirt Road The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #98. Elephant The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #99. Elephant The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #100. Elephant Mother And Baby The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #101. Elephant Eye Closeup The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #102. Elephant Eye Closeup The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #103. Elephant Closeup The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #104. Elephant Baby The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #105. Elephant Closeup The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #106. Elephant Eye Closeup The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #107. Vervet Monkey In Tree These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50 cm for males to about 40 cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social and dependent alcohol use.

Image #108. Vervet Monkey Eating These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50 cm for males to about 40 cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social and dependent alcohol use.

Image #109. Vervet Monkey Eating These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50 cm for males to about 40 cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social and dependent alcohol use.

Image #110. Vervet Monkey Keeping a Lookout These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50 cm for males to about 40 cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social and dependent alcohol use.

Image #111. Vervet Monkey Eating Vervet Monkey, playing in a tree. These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50 cm for males to about 40 cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social and dependent alcohol use.

Image #112. Vervet Monkey Sitting Vervet Monkey, sitting at the roadside. These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50cm for males to about 40cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social, dependent alcohol use.

Image #113. Vervet Monkey Eating These mostly vegetarian monkeys have black faces and grey body hair color, ranging in length from about 50cm for males to about 40cm for females. In addition to very interesting behavioral research on natural populations, vervet monkeys serve as a nonhuman primate model for understanding genetic and social behaviors of humans. They have been noted for having human-like characteristics, such as hypertension, anxiety, and social, dependent alcohol use.

Image #114. Young Cheetah A young cheetah resting in a rehab center in Hoedspruit, South Africa. The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 112 to 120 km/h in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in three seconds. The adult cheetah weighs from 21 to 72 kg. Its total head and body length is from 110 to 150 cm, while the tail can measure 60 to 84 cm in length.

Image #115. Baby Elephant Walking On Dirt Road The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #116. Two Zebras Stationary Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #117. Angry Male Elephant The African Elephant, Loxodonta, is the largest living terrestrial animal. Their large ears enable heat loss. The trunk acts as a fifth limb, a sound amplifier, and an important method of touch. The largest recorded individual stood 4M at the shoulders and weighed 10T. Elephants use some vocalisations that are beyond the hearing range of humans, to communicate across large distances. Elephant mating rituals include the gentle entwining of their trunks.

Image #118. Cheetah Mom & Three Cubs A cheetah mother and her three almost fully grown cubs, shelter from the African heat after a hunting lesson. The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 112 to 120 km/h in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in three seconds. The adult cheetah weighs from 21 to 72 kg. Its total head and body length is from 110 to 150 cm, while the tail can measure 60 to 84 cm in length.

 

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