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African Birds

Stock Photography By Clive Smith

A collection of stock photography, mostly captured in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kms in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kms from north to south and 65 kms from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Vultures In A Tree
#691222
© Clive Smith
Vulture In Flight
#691221
© Clive Smith
African Fish Eagle In A Tree
#691220
© Clive Smith
African Fish Eagle
#691219
© Clive Smith
African Fish Eagle In A Tree
#691218
© Clive Smith
African Jacana Lilly Hopping In
#691217
© Clive Smith
Hamerkop Patiently Awaiting His
#691216
© Clive Smith
Swainson's Francolin Takes
#691215
© Clive Smith
Lapwing At The Edge Of The
#691210
© Clive Smith
Lapwing At The Edge Of The
#691209
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron Fishing
#691204
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron On Tree Stump
#691203
© Clive Smith
Scops Owl
#691202
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron Fishing
#691201
© Clive Smith
Grey Heron And Crocodile
#691200
© Clive Smith
Giant Kingfisher
#691199
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller In A Bush
#691198
© Clive Smith
Saddle-Billed Stork Fishing
#691197
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller On
#691195
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller On Road
#691194
© Clive Smith
Lilac-Breasted Roller Taking
#691193
© Clive Smith

 

Photo Captions for African Birds

Image #1. Vultures In A Tree A group of vultures hang around for their next meal. Vultures seldom attack healthy animals, but may kill the wounded or sick. When a carcass has too thick a hide for its beak to open, it waits for a larger scavenger to eat first. Vast numbers have been seen upon battlefields. They gorge themselves when prey is abundant, until their crop bulges, and sit, sleepy or half torpid, to digest their food. These birds do not carry food to their young in their claws, but disgorge it from the crop.

Image #2. Vulture In Flight A vulture takes off in search of his prey. Vultures seldom attack healthy animals, but may kill the wounded or sick. When a carcass has too thick a hide for its beak to open, it waits for a larger scavenger to eat first. Vast numbers have been seen upon battlefields. They gorge themselves when prey is abundant, until their crop bulges, and sit, sleepy or half torpid, to digest their food. These birds do not carry food to their young in their claws, but disgorge it from the crop.

Image #3. African Fish Eagle In A Tree An African Fish Eagle, Haliaeetus Vocifer, watches for food from a tall tree. The African fish eagle is a large bird, and the female, at 3.2-3.6 kg is larger than the male, at 2-2.5 kg. Males usually have a wingspan of about 2 m, while females have wingspans of 2.4 m. While this species mainly subsists on fish, it is opportunistic and may take a wider variety of prey such as waterbirds. Its distinctive cry is, for many, evocative of the spirit or essence of Africa.

Image #4. African Fish Eagle An African Fish Eagle, Haliaeetus Vocifer, takes off with some twigs for a nest. The African fish eagle is a large bird, and the female, at 3.2-3.6 kg is larger than the male, at 2-2.5 kg. Males usually have a wingspan of about 2 m, while females have wingspans of 2.4 m. While this species mainly subsists on fish, it is opportunistic and may take a wider variety of prey such as waterbirds. Its distinctive cry is, for many, evocative of the spirit or essence of Africa.

Image #5. African Fish Eagle In A Tree An African Fish Eagle, Haliaeetus Vocifer, watches for food from a tall tree. The African fish eagle is a large bird, and the female, at 3.2-3.6 kg is larger than the male, at 2-2.5 kg. Males usually have a wingspan of about 2 m, while females have wingspans of 2.4 m. While this species mainly subsists on fish, it is opportunistic and may take a wider variety of prey such as waterbirds. Its distinctive cry is, for many, evocative of the spirit or essence of Africa.

Image #6. African Jacana Lilly Hopping In Search Of Food An African Jacana, Actophilornis Africanus, hopes from pad to pad. African Jacanas are conspicuous and unmistakable birds. They are about 30cm long, but females are larger than males. African Jacanas feed on insects and other invertebrates picked from the floating vegetation or the surface of the water.

Image #7. Hamerkop Patiently Awaiting His Next Meal The Hamerkop, Scopus Umbretta, is a medium-sized wading bird 56 cms in length with a weight of 470 grams. The shape of its head with a long bill and crest at the back is reminiscent of a hammer, hence its name. Hamerkops feed during the day, often taking a break at noon to roost. They normally feed alone or in pairs. The food is typical of long-legged wading birds, and the most important is amphibians. They also eat fish, shrimp, insects and rodents.

Image #8. Swainson's Francolin Takes A Bath A mother Swainson's Francolin, Francolinus Swainsonii, takes a dust bath, whilst her baby walks away. Francolins are terrestrial (though not flightless) birds that feed on insects, vegetable matter and seeds. Most of the members have a hooked upper beak, well-suited for digging at the bases of grass tussocks and rootballs. They have wide tails with fourteen retrice feathers.

Image #9. Lapwing At The Edge Of The Water Vanellinae are any of various crested plovers, family Charadriidae, noted for its slow, irregular wingbeat in flight and a shrill, wailing cry. Its length is 10–16 inches. They are a subfamily of medium-sized wading birds which also includes the plovers and dotterels. The Vanellinae are collectively called lapwings but also contain the ancient red-kneed dotterel. A lapwing can be thought of as a larger plover.

Image #10. Lapwing At The Edge Of The Water Vanellinae are any of various crested plovers, family Charadriidae, noted for its slow, irregular wingbeat in flight and a shrill, wailing cry. Its length is 10–16 inches. They are a subfamily of medium-sized wading birds which also includes the plovers and dotterels. The Vanellinae are collectively called lapwings but also contain the ancient red-kneed dotterel. A lapwing can be thought of as a larger plover.

Image #11. Grey Heron Fishing The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #12. Grey Heron On Tree Stump The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #13. Scops Owl Scops Owl, Otus Scops, hunt from perches in semi-open landscapes. They prefer areas which contain old trees with hollows; these are home to their prey which includes insects, reptiles, small mammals such as bats and mice and other small birds. Scops will also eat earthworms, amphibians and aquatic invertebrates. Scops have a good sense of hearing which helps them locate their prey in any habitat. They also possess well-developed raptorial claws and a curved bill.

Image #14. Grey Heron Fishing The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #15. Grey Heron And Crocodile The grey heron, Ardea Cinerea, is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Image #16. Giant Kingfisher Giant Kingfisher, Megaceryle Maxima, is the largest kingfisher in Africa. The Giant Kingfisher is 42–48 cm long, with a large crest and finely spotted white on black upperparts. The male has a chestnut breast band and otherwise white underparts with dark flank barring, and the female has a white-spotted black breast band and chestnut belly. This large species feeds mainly on crabs, fish, and frogs, caught in the typical kingfisher way, by a dive from a perch.

Image #17. Lilac-Breasted Roller In A Bush Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

Image #18. Saddle-Billed Stork Fishing Saddle-Billed Stork, Ephippiorhynchus Senegalensis, is a large wading bird in the stork family, Ciconiidae. It is a huge bird that regularly attains a height of 150 cm, a length of 142 cm and a 2.4–2.7 m wingspan. The male is larger and heavier than the female, with a range of 5.1–7.5 kg. The female is usually between 5 and 7 kg. The saddle-billed stork feeds mainly on fish, frogs and crabs, but also on small birds and reptiles. They move in a deliberate and stately manner.

Image #19. Lilac-Breasted Roller On Signpost Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

Image #20. Lilac-Breasted Roller On Road Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

Image #21. Lilac-Breasted Roller Taking Off From Road Lilac-Breasted Roller, Coracias Caudatus, is It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and the southern Arabian Peninsula, preferring open woodland and savanna; it is largely absent from treeless places. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about at ground level. This species is the national bird of Botswana and Kenya.

 

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