Stock Photo Search:
  Advanced Search Options

African Buck - Assorted

Stock Photography By Clive Smith

A collection of stock photography, mostly captured in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kms in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kms from north to south and 65 kms from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Greater Kudu Male
#691188
© Clive Smith
Greater Kudu At Waterhole
#691190
© Clive Smith
Male Nyala
#691192
© Clive Smith
Greater Kudu Female
#691191
© Clive Smith
Greater Kudu Female
#691189
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Female
#691187
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Grazing
#691186
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Grazing
#691185
© Clive Smith
Waterbuck Male
#691184
© Clive Smith
Impala Male
#691156
© Clive Smith
Impala Female
#691155
© Clive Smith
Impala Male
#691154
© Clive Smith

 

Photo Captions for African Buck - Assorted

Image #1. Greater Kudu Male A Male Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros, crosses the road. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #2. Greater Kudu At Waterhole A Male Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros, stands alert at a watering hole. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #3. Male Nyala Male Nyala, Nyala Angasii or Tragelaphus Angasii, also called Inyala, is a spiral-horned antelope native to southern Africa. The body length is 135–195 cm, and it weighs 55–140 kg. As a herbivore, the nyala feeds upon foliage, fruits and grasses, with sufficient fresh water. A shy animal, it prefers water holes rather than open spaces.

Image #4. Greater Kudu Female A Female Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #5. Greater Kudu Female A Female Kudu, Tragelaphus Strepsiceros, in the bush. This is one of the largest species of antelope. Males weigh 190–270 kg, with a maximum of 315 kg, and stand up to 160 cm tall at the shoulder. The ears of the greater kudu are large and round. Females weigh 120–210 kg and stand as little as 100 cm tall at the shoulder; they are hornless, without a beard or nose markings.

Image #6. Waterbuck Female A Female Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #7. Waterbuck Grazing Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus, graze in the river. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #8. Waterbuck Grazing Three Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus, graze in the river. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #9. Waterbuck Male A Male Waterbuck, Kobus Ellipsiprymnus, looks at the camera. The head and body length is typically between 177–235 cm and the average height is between 120 and 136 cm. Males reach approximately 127 cm at the shoulder, while females reach 119 cm. Males typically weigh 198–262 kg and females 161–214 kg. The waterbuck is of robust build. The shaggy coat is reddish brown to grey, and becomes progressively darker with age. Though apparently thick, the hair is sparse on the coat.

Image #10. Impala Male Impala male, Aepyceros Melampus, closeup. Impalas are typically between 120–160 cm long. Males stand up to approximately 75–92 cm at the shoulder and weigh 53–76 kg, while females are 70–85 cm and 40–53 kg. Both are characterised by a glossy, reddish brown coat. Only the males have the characteristic slender, lyre-shaped horns, which can grow to be 45–92 cm long. Impala are fast runners and are known for their leaping ability, reaching heights up to 3m.

Image #11. Impala Female Impala female, Aepyceros Melampus, looking towards the camera. Impalas are typically between 120–160 cm long. Males stand up to approximately 75–92 cm at the shoulder and weigh 53–76 kg, while females are 70–85 cm and 40–53 kg. Both are characterised by a glossy, reddish brown coat. Only the males have the characteristic slender, lyre-shaped horns, which can grow to be 45–92 cm long. Impala are fast runners and are known for their leaping ability, reaching heights up to 3m.

Image #12. Impala Male Impala male, Aepyceros Melampus, looking towards the camera. Impalas are typically between 120–160 cm long. Males stand up to approximately 75–92 cm at the shoulder and weigh 53–76 kg, while females are 70–85 cm and 40–53 kg. Both are characterised by a glossy, reddish brown coat. Only the males have the characteristic slender, lyre-shaped horns, which can grow to be 45–92 cm long. Impala are fast runners and are known for their leaping ability, reaching heights up to 3m.

 

Printer-Friendly Version   |   More Photography From Clive Smith

[ This Stock Photo Set Has Been Viewed 1326 Times Since The Last Reset ]