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African Giraffe, Zebra, Wildebeest And Buffalo

Stock Photography By Clive Smith

A collection of wildlife stock photography, mostly captured in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kms in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kms from north to south and 65 kms from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Giraffe Drinking
#691196
© Clive Smith
Zebra Baby
#691146
© Clive Smith
Two Zebras Stationary
#691082
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691145
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691144
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691143
© Clive Smith
Zebra Grazing
#691142
© Clive Smith
Zebra
#691147
© Clive Smith
Zebra Alert
#691141
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest
#691153
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest Grazing
#691152
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest Vertical
#691151
© Clive Smith
Blue Wildebeest Staring
#691150
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo
#691134
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo Grazing
#691133
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo
#691132
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo
#691131
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo At The River
#691148
© Clive Smith
African Buffalo At The River
#691149
© Clive Smith

 

Photo Captions for African Giraffe, Zebra, Wildebeest And Buffalo

Image #1. Giraffe Drinking The Giraffe, Giraffa Camelopardalis, is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest living terrestrial animal and the largest ruminant. Giraffes usually inhabit savannas, grasslands, and open woodlands. Their primary food source is acacia leaves, which they browse at heights most other herbivores cannot reach. Giraffes are preyed on by lions; their calves are also targeted by leopards, spotted hyenas, and wild dogs. They are at their most vulnerable when bending down.

Image #2. Zebra Baby Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #3. Two Zebras Stationary Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #4. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #5. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #6. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #7. Zebra Grazing Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #8. Zebra Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #9. Zebra Alert Zebras stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. They are generally social animals that live in small to large herds. Unlike their closest relatives, horses, zebras have never been truly domesticated. Zebras feed almost entirely on grasses, but may occasionally eat shrubs, herbs, twigs, leaves and bark. Their digestive systems allow them to subsist on diets of lower nutritional quality than that necessary for other herbivores.

Image #10. Blue Wildebeest Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, under a tree. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #11. Blue Wildebeest Grazing Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, grazing. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #12. Blue Wildebeest Vertical Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, looking at the camera. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #13. Blue Wildebeest Staring Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes Taurinus, staring at the camera. The blue wildebeest is a herbivore, feeding primarily on short grasses. It forms herds which move about in loose aggregations, the animals being fast runners and extremely wary. The mating season begins at the end of the rainy season and a single calf is usually born after a gestational period of about eight and a half months. The calf remains with its mother for eight months, after which time it joins a juvenile herd.

Image #14. African Buffalo An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, sniffing the air for danger, showing his teeth. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #15. African Buffalo Grazing An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, grazing. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #16. African Buffalo An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, sniffing the air for danger. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #17. African Buffalo An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, grazing. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #18. African Buffalo At The River An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, lying in a river to cool off. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

Image #19. African Buffalo At The River An African Buffalo, Syncerus Caffer, lying in a river to cool off. Owing to its unpredictable nature, which makes it highly dangerous to humans, the African buffalo has never been domesticated unlike its Asian counterpart, the Asian buffalo. Its shoulder height can range from 1 to 1.7 m and its head and body length can range from 1.7 to 3.4 m. Savannah-type buffaloes weigh 500 to 900 kg, with males normally larger than females, reaching the upper weight range.

 

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