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African Hyena And Cape Hunting Dog

Stock Photography By Clive Smith

A collection of stock photography, mostly captured in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kms in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kms from north to south and 65 kms from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Baby Spotted Hyena Walking
#691174
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691176
© Clive Smith
Young Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691175
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691173
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside
#691172
© Clive Smith
Baby Spotted Hyena Under Bush
#691171
© Clive Smith
Cape Hunting Dog
#691183
© Clive Smith

 

Photo Captions for African Hyena And Cape Hunting Dog

Image #1. Baby Spotted Hyena Walking A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, walking towards camera. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #2. Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking out from his lair, waiting for his parents, looking at a potential meal. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance.

Image #3. Young Spotted Hyena At Roadside A young Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking out from his lair, waiting for his parents. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km

Image #4. Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, lies on the sand. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #5. Baby Spotted Hyena At Roadside A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking out from his lair, waiting for his parents. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #6. Baby Spotted Hyena Under Bush A baby Spotted Hyena, Crocuta Crocuta, looking our from under a bush. The spotted hyena displays greater plasticity in its hunting and foraging behaviour than other African carnivores; it hunts alone, in small parties of 2–5 individuals or in large groups. During a hunt, spotted hyenas often run through ungulate herds in order to select an individual to attack. Once selected, their prey is chased over long distance, often several kilometres, at speeds of up to 60 km/h.

Image #7. Cape Hunting Dog A Cape Hunting Dog, Lycaon Pictus, looking for food. It is found only in Africa, especially in savannas and lightly wooded areas. They live and hunt in large packs. Like most members of the dog family, it pursues its prey in a long, open chase. These chases may occur at great speeds of up to 66 km/hr for 10 to 60 minutes. Nearly 80% of all wild dog hunts end in a kill; for comparison, the success rate of lions, often viewed as ultimate predators, is only 30%

 

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