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African Lion, Cheetah & Rhino - South Africa

Stock Photography By Clive Smith

A collection of stock photography, mostly captured in the Kruger National Park in South Africa. The Kruger National Park is one of the largest game reserves in Africa. It covers an area of 19,633 square kms in northeastern South Africa, and extends 360 kms from north to south and 65 kms from east to west. It is proudly home to The Big 5!

Lion Roar
#691168
© Clive Smith
Lion
#691167
© Clive Smith
Lion Roar
#691166
© Clive Smith
Lion With Kill
#691165
© Clive Smith
Rhino Resting
#691139
© Clive Smith
Rhino Head-On
#691138
© Clive Smith
Rhino Muddy
#691137
© Clive Smith
Rhino Mother And Calf
#691136
© Clive Smith
Young Cheetah
#691085
© Clive Smith
Cheetah Mom & Three Cubs
#691078
© Clive Smith

 

Photo Captions for African Lion, Cheetah & Rhino - South Africa

Image #1. Lion Roar A Lion, Panthera Leo, roars for his mate. Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #2. Lion Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #3. Lion Roar A Lion, Panthera Leo, roars for his mate. Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #4. Lion With Kill A male Lion, Panthera Leo, walks away with kill in his mouth. Lions live for 10–14 years in the wild, while in captivity they can live longer than 20 years. In the wild, males seldom live longer than 10 years, as injuries sustained from continual fighting with rival males greatly reduce their longevity. They typically inhabit savanna and grassland, although they may take to bush and forest. A pride of lions consists of related females and offspring and a small number of adult males.

Image #5. Rhino Resting A Rhino, Rhinocerotidae, resting and recovering, having had his horn hacked off by poachers. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #6. Rhino Head-On A Rhino, Rhinocerotidae, in the tall grass, looking at us head-on. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #7. Rhino Muddy A Rhino, Rhinocerotidae, returns from the river after a mud bath. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #8. Rhino Mother And Calf A Rhino mother and calf, Rhinocerotidae, crossing a road. Rhinos are killed by humans for their horns, which are bought and sold on the black market, and which are used by some cultures for ornamental or traditional medicinal purposes. East Asia, specifically Vietnam, is the largest market for rhino horns. In 2013, a total of 1004 Rhino were slaughtered for their horns, a situation that cannot carry on, if the continuation of the species is to succeed.

Image #9. Young Cheetah A young cheetah resting in a rehab center in Hoedspruit, South Africa. The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 112 to 120 km/h in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in three seconds. The adult cheetah weighs from 21 to 72 kg. Its total head and body length is from 110 to 150 cm, while the tail can measure 60 to 84 cm in length.

Image #10. Cheetah Mom & Three Cubs A cheetah mother and her three almost fully grown cubs, shelter from the African heat after a hunting lesson. The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 112 to 120 km/h in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in three seconds. The adult cheetah weighs from 21 to 72 kg. Its total head and body length is from 110 to 150 cm, while the tail can measure 60 to 84 cm in length.

 

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