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Making Aboriginal Art

Stock Photography By David C Hancock

Aboriginal people use all manner of materials to produce some majestic art, whether it be painting, weaving, carving or simply drawing designs and patterns in the sand. In the north of Australia women weave intricate containers and mats made from the leaves of pandanus palms and coloured by various natural dyes from roots, tubers and bulbs. Painting on tree bark is also extensive but the bark must be harvested at the end of the wet season, when it is soft.

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Photo Captions for Making Aboriginal Art

Image #1. Making Aboriginal Art Aboriginal women from Howard Island, off the Arnhem Land coast, with rope made the traditional way, from bark of kurajong tree.

Image #2. Making Aboriginal Art Bawinanga AC, Maningrida. Women's Centre - artist Deborah Wurrkidj works on the detail from a screen printed piece of cloth.

Image #3. Making Aboriginal Art Bawinanga AC, Maningrida. Women's Centre - artist Elizabeth Kandabuma works on the detail from a screen printed piece of cloth.

Image #4. Making Aboriginal Art Aboriginal artist Long Jong Dewar cuta a piece of bark from a stringybark (eucalypt) tree near Manyallaluk to paint on.

Image #5. Making Aboriginal Art Aboriginal girl from Howard Island, off the coast of Arnhem Land, holds a "Madonna basket" as part of the String Festival in Darwin.

Image #6. Making Aboriginal Art Tiwi artist Bede Tungatalum working on pakumani poles outside his house at Nguiu, Bathurst island.

Image #7. Making Aboriginal Art Bawinanga AC, Maningrida. Women's Centre - artist Deborah Wurrkidj works on the detail from a screen printed piece of cloth.

Image #8. Making Aboriginal Art 209794 Aboriginal artist "Long John" Dewar trims a piece of bark from a stringybark (eucalypt) tree, near Manyallaluk in southern Arnhem Land.

Image #9. Making Aboriginal Art Efforts to revive and strengthen indigenous language in central australia involve linguists, missionary groups and traditional aboriginal women. Ladies from Ti Tree - Eileen Campbell (seated) uses leaves in the sand to illustrate stories about cultural matters - Jenny Green (blue top) and Margot Carew (black) records them

Image #10. Making Aboriginal Art Tiwi artist paints some detail on a screen print at Bathurst Island art centre

Image #11. Making Aboriginal Art Yolngu Aboriginal people from north-east Arnhem Land celebrate their culture at the annual Garma Festival. Using a fine brush of hair to paint bark.

Image #12. Making Aboriginal Art Yolnu Aboriginal people of north-east Arnhem Land. Yalmay Yunupingu dyes pandanus fronds for weaving.

Image #13. Making Aboriginal Art Aboriginal women from Howard Island, off the Arnhem Land coast, making rope in the traditional way, from kurajong bark. Darwin Festival.

Image #14. Making Aboriginal Art Tiwi artist paints some detail on a screen print at Bathurst Island art centre

Image #15. Making Aboriginal Art Aboriginal person paints using a fine brush of hair to paint bark. Art.

Image #16. Making Aboriginal Art A Jawoyn woman holds the bulb of a plant she has dug and washed clean of dirt. It is used to dye pandanus red for weaving. 106807 Photographer:David Hancock/Copyright:SkyScans

Image #17. Making Aboriginal Art Efforts to revive and strengthen indigenous language in central australia involve linguists, missionary groups and traditional aboriginal women. Ladies from Ti Tree - Eileen Campbell (seated left) and daughter April Campbell (seated right) draw designs in the sand to illustrate culrural matters - Jenny Green (blue top) and Margot Carew (black) records them

Image #18. Making Aboriginal Art Efforts to revive and strengthen indigenous language in central australia involve linguists, missionary groups and traditional aboriginal women. Ladies from Ti Tree - Eileen Campbell (seated left) and daughter April Campbell (seated right) draw designs in the sand to illustrate culrural matters - Jenny Green (blue top) and Margot Carew (black) records them

Image #19. Making Aboriginal Art Warddeken IPA - indigenous landowners walk across their country to reaquaint themselves with names and places. Landscape and aerials of the Arnhem Land plateau and stone country. Elizabeth Nabarlambarl preparing pandanus for weaving.

Image #20. Making Aboriginal Art Warddeken IPA - indigenous landowners walk across their country to reaquaint themselves with names and places. Landscape and aerials of the Arnhem Land plateau and stone country. Terrah Guymala and his family - wife Sarah Nabarlambarl, daughter Aspellita - preparing pandanus for weaving.

Image #21. Making Aboriginal Art Efforts to revive and strengthen indigenous language in central australia involve linguists, missionary groups and traditional aboriginal women. Ladies from Ti Tree - Eileen Campbell (seated left) and daughter April Campbell (seated right) draw designs in the sand to illustrate culrural matters - Jenny Green (blue top) and Margot Carew (black) records them

Image #22. Making Aboriginal Art Efforts to revive and strengthen indigenous language in central australia involve linguists, missionary groups and traditional aboriginal women. Ladies from Ti Tree - Eileen Campbell (seated left) and daughter April Campbell (seated right) draw designs in the sand to illustrate culrural matters - Jenny Green (blue top) and Margot Carew (black) records them

Image #23. Making Aboriginal Art Efforts to revive and strengthen indigenous language in central australia ivolve linguists, missionary groups and traditional aboriginal women. Ladies from Ti Tree in the riverbed of the Hanson River - L to R: Eileen Campbell, Molly Presley, Mandy Long

Image #24. Making Aboriginal Art Warddeken IPA - indigenous landowners walk across their country to reaquaint themselves with names and places. Landscape and aerials of the Arnhem Land plateau and stone country. Elizabeth Nabarlambarl preparing pandanus for weaving.

Image #25. Making Aboriginal Art Warddeken IPA - indigenous landowners walk across their country to reaquaint themselves with names and places. Landscape and aerials of the Arnhem Land plateau and stone country. Terrah Guymala and his family - wife Sarah Nabarlambarl, daughter Aspellita - preparing pandanus for weaving.

Image #26. Making Aboriginal Art Tiwi Tours operates atour to Bathurst and Melville Islands where visitors get to visit the "morning tea ladies" who tell them about local customs, show them arts and craft such as weaving and perform dancing with family members. They also visit craft centres - Tiwi Designs and Bima Wear Bima Wear women: (front) Noreen Kerinauia, Lucia Pilakui, Marita Kantilla; (behind) Margaret Rose Kantilla, Carmel Kantilla, Antoinette Tipaloura, Genivieve Portamini, Rita Kerinarua.

Image #27. Making Aboriginal Art Tiwi Tours operates atour to Bathurst and Melville Islands where visitors get to visit the "morning tea ladies" who tell them about local customs, show them arts and craft such as weaving and perform dancing with family members. They also visit craft centres - Tiwi Designs and Bima Wear Carmel and Margaret Rose Kantilla screen printing material.

Image #28. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites

Image #29. Making Aboriginal Art Warddeken IPA - indigenous landowners walk across their country to reaquaint themselves with names and places. Landscape and aerials of the Arnhem Land plateau and stone country. Terrah Guymala and his family - wife Sarah Nabarlambarl, daughter Aspellita - preparing pandanus for weaving.

Image #30. Making Aboriginal Art Maningrida - programs under the NT Government's "Working Future" plans to improve infrastructure in the areas of housing, health, education, policing and employment. Art class at Maningrida School

Image #31. Making Aboriginal Art Tiwi Tours operates atour to Bathurst and Melville Islands where visitors get to visit the "morning tea ladies" who tell them about local customs, show them arts and craft such as weaving and perform dancing with family members. They also visit craft centres - Tiwi Designs and Bima Wear Noella Babui

Image #32. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather pandaus leaves for weaving on the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pamkal (dark frizzy hair red top), Merrill Namundja (Seraine's

Image #33. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather "colour" to colour pandaus leaves for weaving on the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pamkal (dark frizzy hair red top)

Image #34. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather "colour" - roots of the kurrajong tree - to colour pandaus leaves for weaving on the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pa

Image #35. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather "colour" - roots of the kurrajong tree - to colour pandaus leaves for weaving on the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pa

Image #36. Making Aboriginal Art Long John Dewar, artist at Manyallaluk, collecting and trimming bark for painting.

Image #37. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sitesThe Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve System of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Abor

Image #38. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather "colour" - roots of the kurrajong tree - to colour pandaus leaves for weaving on the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pa

Image #39. Making Aboriginal Art The Warrdeken Indigenous Protected Area, east of kakadu NP, is a large area that has been incorporated into the National Reserve Systme of parks and reserves. It is managed by local Aboriginal people who have responsibility for looking after the area, which is rich in fauna and flora and aboriginal cultural sites. Women gather "colour" - to colour pandaus leaves for weaving on the Arnhem Land Plateau. Mary Kalkkiwara (old lady grey hair), Carole Pamkal (dark frizzy hair red to

Image #40. Making Aboriginal Art Long John Dewar, artist at Manyallaluk, collecting and trimming bark for painting.

 

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