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Insects

Stock Photography By Robert Baillie

British and Foreign Insects

Peacock Butterfly
#726244
© Robert Baillie
Comma Butterfly
#726243
© Robert Baillie
Owl Butterfly
#726246
© Robert Baillie
Common Darter Dragonfly
#726254
© Robert Baillie
Common Darter Dragonfly
#726255
© Robert Baillie
Common Darter Dragonfly
#726253
© Robert Baillie
Common Darter Dragonfly
#726252
© Robert Baillie
Common Darter Dragonfly
#726251
© Robert Baillie
Meadow Brown Butterfly
#726567
© Robert Baillie
Peacock Butterfly
#726242
© Robert Baillie
Gatekeeper Butterfly
#726248
© Robert Baillie
Red Admiral Butterfly
#726247
© Robert Baillie
Marbled White Butterfly
#726245
© Robert Baillie
Clouded Yellow Butterfly
#726249
© Robert Baillie

 

Photo Captions for Insects

Image #1. Peacock Butterfly The Peacock's (Aglais io) spectacular pattern of eyespots, evolved to startle or confuse predators, make it one of the most easily recognized and best known species. It is from these wing markings that the butterfly gained its common name. Undersides of the wings are very dark and look like dead leaves. A fairly large butterfly and a strong flyer with red wings with black markings and distinctive eyespots on tips of fore and hind wings. Although a familiar visitor to garden buddleias in

Image #2. Comma Butterfly The Comma (Polygonia c-album) is a fascinating butterfly. The scalloped edges and cryptic colouring of the wings conceal hibernating adults amongst dead leaves, while the larvae, flecked with brown and white markings, bear close resemblance to bird droppings. Ragged wing edges distinguish this orange and brown butterfly. Undersides are brown with a white mark shaped like a comma. The species has a flexible life cycle, which allows it to capitalize on favourable weather conditions. However, the m

Image #3. Owl Butterfly The owl butterflies, the genus Caligo, are known for their huge eyespots, which resemble owls' eyes. They are found in the rainforests and secondary forests of Mexico, Central, and South America. Owl butterflies are very large, 65–200 mm (2.6–7.9 in), and fly only a few meters at a time, so avian predators have little difficulty in following them to their settling place. However, the butterflies preferentially fly in dusk, when few avian predators ar

Image #4. Common Darter Dragonfly The common darter (Sympetrum striolatum) is a dragonfly of the family Libellulidae native to Eurasia. It is one of the most common dragonflies in Europe, occurring in a wide variety of water bodies, though with a preference for breeding in still water such as ponds and lakes. In the south of its range adults are on the wing all year round. A summer and autumn species, this dragonfly can be found well into November and may be one of the last on the wing in the UK. The thorax in both sexes is brow

Image #5. Common Darter Dragonfly The common darter (Sympetrum striolatum) is a dragonfly of the family Libellulidae native to Eurasia. It is one of the most common dragonflies in Europe, occurring in a wide variety of water bodies, though with a preference for breeding in still water such as ponds and lakes. In the south of its range adults are on the wing all year round. A summer and autumn species, this dragonfly can be found well into November and may be one of the last on the wing in the UK. The thorax in both sexes is brow

Image #6. Common Darter Dragonfly The common darter (Sympetrum striolatum) is a dragonfly of the family Libellulidae native to Eurasia. It is one of the most common dragonflies in Europe, occurring in a wide variety of water bodies, though with a preference for breeding in still water such as ponds and lakes. In the south of its range adults are on the wing all year round. A summer and autumn species, this dragonfly can be found well into November and may be one of the last on the wing in the UK. The thorax in both sexes is brow

Image #7. Common Darter Dragonfly The common darter (Sympetrum striolatum) is a dragonfly of the family Libellulidae native to Eurasia. It is one of the most common dragonflies in Europe, occurring in a wide variety of water bodies, though with a preference for breeding in still water such as ponds and lakes. In the south of its range adults are on the wing all year round. A summer and autumn species, this dragonfly can be found well into November and may be one of the last on the wing in the UK. The thorax in both sexes is brow

Image #8. Common Darter Dragonfly The common darter (Sympetrum striolatum) is a dragonfly of the family Libellulidae native to Eurasia. It is one of the most common dragonflies in Europe, occurring in a wide variety of water bodies, though with a preference for breeding in still water such as ponds and lakes. In the south of its range adults are on the wing all year round. A summer and autumn species, this dragonfly can be found well into November and may be one of the last on the wing in the UK. The thorax in both sexes is brow

Image #9. Meadow Brown Butterfly In the right habitat the Meadow Brown (Maniola jurtina) can be the most abundant butterfly on the wing. They are often seen in large numbers feeding on Bramble alongside other grassland species such as the Gatekeeper and Ringlet. Like the Ringlet the Meadow Brown will also fly in dull weather... even when its spotting with rain... when most other butterfly species are inactive. The Meadow Brown has many regional variations with various distinctively different spots on the wings.

Image #10. Peacock Butterfly The Peacock's (Aglais io) spectacular pattern of eyespots, evolved to startle or confuse predators, make it one of the most easily recognized and best known species. It is from these wing markings that the butterfly gained its common name. Undersides of the wings are very dark and look like dead leaves. A fairly large butterfly and a strong flyer with red wings with black markings and distinctive eyespots on tips of fore and hind wings. Although a familiar visitor to garden buddleias in

Image #11. Gatekeeper Butterfly The Gatekeeper (Pyronia tithonusor) Hedge Brown as many people prefer to call it is most often found as these names suggest in gateways and hedgerows. It is often seen in association with Meadow Brown and Ringlet. Of these three butterflies, the Gatekeeper is probably the most attractive with its bright orange/brown wings fringed with a wide earthy/grey brown and distinctive black and white eyespot. The colour and patterning of the wings can be very variable and there are several named aberratio

Image #12. Red Admiral Butterfly The Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta) is a common and regular migrant to the UK which in mild winters also survives here (primarily in the south of England) so some of the population are from resident stock. This large black butterfly with a flash of vivid orange-red across its forewings and around the edge of its rear wings and a splatter of white spots towards its wing-tips is a common sight in our gardens during mid-late summer. They are often found nectaring on garden Buddleias Michaelmas Daisy

Image #13. Marbled White Butterfly The Marbled White (Melanargia galathea) is one of our most distinctive butterflies and is unique in terms of its colouration and wing pattern. It is an attractive black and white butterfly which is unlikely to be mistaken for any other species. Its is commonly encountered in grassy meadows and will often feed on purple flowers such as Knapweed Thisles Scabious and Marjoram. It is however classified as a 'Brown' butterfly of the family Satyrinae as its life cycle and habits are ve

Image #14. Clouded Yellow Butterfly The Clouded Yellow (Colias croceuscan) be found throughout England and Wales but is most likely encountered on the South Downs and south coast of England. Numbers vary from year to year depending upon weather conditions as most individuals originate from Mainland Europe. Subsequent breeding of these foreign immigrants may increase the overall UK population later in the flight season. The Clouded Yellow is unable to cope with the cold wet British winter although a year-round breeding population i

 

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